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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
against women in science. behind the headlines: bpa, a chemical used in plastic that's everywhere and raising health concerns. wa >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, tweeting firestorm. gop vice presidential candidate paul ryan generated controversy this week when he stopped off from his campaign to buy hunting gear for his 10-year-old daughter. the avid hunter said his daughter is ready to go hunting for the first time. he bought her a rifle for christmas last year. ryan fans banded together on twitter to show their second amendment support by posting pictures of their daughters shooting all types of guns, ranging from pistols to semi-automatic weapons. the informal girls with guns campaign had hundreds of fans posting stories and pictures to twitter and other social networking sites. but not everyone is all smiles. some parents voiced concern about putting guns in the hands of children. >> so congresswoman, norton, will this help lower the coveted women wrote to the romney/ryan ticket.
very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials wanted to believe the vendors over us because the vendors assured them everything is safe. >> rose: and there was your appointment to the international workshop on international voting president clinton, this book ki
speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech speck that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [
in los cabos mexico and he is co-founder of the new england institute for cognitive science and evolutionary studies, associate professor of philosophy and religious studies at the university of new england. he has been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way ine world, even though that way is often not great. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition, and into the conditions some humans place on play some others, we present him the anisfeld-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> the this is wonderful. and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i i'm going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals of course with the atrocities of the past, but i think it's useful to remind ourselves of the point of considering atrocities of the past is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible things t
to finance the transcontinental railroad, let's start the national academy of sciences, let's start land grant colleges, because we want to give these gateways of opportunity for all americans, because if all americans are getting opportunity, were all one of the better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, but enhances it. what i have tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. and when it comes to education, what i've said is we've got to reform schools that are not working. we something called race to the top. we've said, we will give you more money if you initiate reforms. as a consequence, had 46 states around the country have made a real difference. but what i've also said is, let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead and our people are skilled and able to succeed. and hard-pressed states right now cannot all do that. in fact, we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't think any more teachers. i do, because i think that is the kind
search spending, perhaps new colors and computer science graduates the press people coming in from out a state of getting the shop's wares people and laid off from manufacturing plant or call center do not have the skills the required to fill the shops. the will be left out. >>> another thing with the job statistics is when the call center is closing are shifting its call centers of state. and campbell soup and the governor and the politicians create all these other jobs. my question is are the jobs your greeting now to the how to pay and benefits that the old jobs have? or the new jobs different? >>> there's a fundamental shift in the skills that required for these new jobs. it used to be the case that could high-school graduate work at high school education and concurrent yourself a middle-class income and and and nothing gets no longer the case. >>> college crash which now are being hired full-time but they're piling on part-time. index difficult to bridge over into full time because the market to benefit cost them. is not the same job as it was before. >>> some the jobs are not ava
? that means the world has to be like 90% air. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. of air. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "state of the air" app at lung.org. ♪ john: in america of the welfare state grows and government takes more power. i hope that will change, but i'm not optimistic as thomas jefferson said, the natural progressive things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. he said that years ago, and he has been proven right. what if there was a way to create a new kind of government, a more limited one that jefferson had in mind that helps poor people by freeing the free-market to work its magic. a free city not too far from the united states where americans could move. that may happen cent. a central american country recently signed an agreement with a group of investors to build a privately run city. its own police fo
and is a prize catch for the life sciences initiative. >> what are your thoughts? >> pretty exciting. there are a host of different technologies i have come in contact with over the last few years as we have been building the medical device and life sciences here, that are transformative. >> she sat down with others, hoping to use the system, which ultimately may include war injured veterans. >> when somebody tells you you're not going to be able to walk again, all you think about are the doors closing behind you. this is opening alm these doors for me. >> wow. stay with us. there's much more ahead on 11 news sunday morning. first, looking at events around town this weekend. ♪ [ female announcer ] at yoplait, we want you to feel even better about your favorite flavors. so when you call, tweet, and post, we listen. that's why yoplait light and yoplait original are now made with no high fructose corn syrup. and why we use only natural colors and natural flavors in yoplait original. so, anything else we can do for you, let us know. but you'll keep it to yogurt, right? 'cause we should
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
woman elected to the senate in her own right. there was an article about what the science article written about 30 or 35 years ago about the women in congress and the title was over his dead body. and there's still quite a few women in congress who got their because their husbands die. some of the first women, she followed her husband who had died when the policy and then took that over. and so, kassebaum was the first one who would never followed the south. and now once again gave her a lot of tension. it is a very highly visible rays, covered even one of the london newspapers commented it the day after the election. q. we have one woman in the senate. if you're one woman you would get a lot of attention. two years after she was elected she was like one of the temperatures of the national convention. people were already touting her as a national force a national figure. and she had a lot going for her that i think they commanders should be undertaken if that's not presidential, at least vice presidential. that way she blended with what was said was talking about. those of you rem
always console himself with the political science which shows that presidential debates rarely affect the outcome of an election. even if you think your guy won, is it going to help? >> sure. the fact that, i heard there was 50 million people watching last night. i would estimate that 20 million of them had never seen anything but an obama mitt romney. never had seen the governor before. they got a chance to see who the real governor is. that he has dealt with these kinds of issues as governor. that he has created bipartisan legislation out of policies and that he understands what is causing the shortage of jobs in america. i go back to what i said. the president demonstrated his incompetent sense and it is amazing to me, now the rehabilitation of the president's mess last night is beginning to start and you see the left-wing press now starting to make up excuses and say, well he just had a bad night. he didn't have a bad night. the obama you saw last night is the obama that has been in the white house for four years. that's why we have a problem. jon: you don't think there will be a
on wednesday night. here's robert gibbs from meet the press. >> it is not rocket science to believe that the president was the disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. >> i think you are going to see a very engaged president that is ready and willing to call out whichever mitt romney shows up. >> reporter: at the same time, the romney campaign is wonder which president obama is going to show up? one said they fully expect the tough, chicago obama to be at the next debate. on the campaign trail, laying out some themes for the next one on one. >> every year, the median income in america's gone down, it's down $4300 a family and the average income of a family around $50,000, that hurts. gasoline prices are up twice what they used to be. these are tough years for the middle class and for the poor in america. >> reporter: of course, economic themes will play very largely into the debate a week from tuesday, as will foreign policy because they are opening up the format to that end, tomorrow at the lexington, virginia, governor romney with a big foreign policy speech. we will b
night. a chief advisor was asked about it this morning. >> it is not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectation that he has if himself. i think you are going to see a very engaged president that is ready and willing to call out whichever mitt romney shows up. >> the romney campaign is wondering which president obama will show up at the next debate. they expect he will be tough and forceful but it is a town-maul -- town-haul debate so there is a real fine line being bullying and forceful. >>heather: thank you, john roberts. >> president obama is spending the day in the biggest blue state, or one of them, california. he arrived for a private event in los angeles minutes ago. that will be followed by a "30 days to victory concert," in los angeles. a big roster of celebrity supporters. he will make remarks along with actor george clooney and here musical performances by jennifer hudson, katy perry and stevie wonder. >> one of the most closely watched u.s. senatations this year is in a dead heat. the outcome of the race could tilt the power of t
respond to electricity. >> science class sparks a bad idea in frankenweenie. a devoted dog owner in the tale and when his pet pal sparky dies victor takes his homework to the next level and brings the dog back to life. soon neighborhood bullies want in on the act which may end up destroying the entire town. it is rated pg. the former secret agent who rescued his kidnapped daughter now needs her help. criminals loyal to those he took out vow revenge and capture the spy and his wife on vacation. he gives his daughter a course on special tactics so they can thwart the bad guys again. taken 2 is rated pg 13. nicole kidman is jail bait inpaper boy a death row groupie trying to free john cusack from prison. jack efron had just been kicked out of college and has a crush on kidman which may turn into a life or death love triangle once the convicted killer is relea d released. the paper boy is rated r. wbal tv 11 news. >> interesting mix there. >> out west you might want to go see a movie with the weather we have coming. >> get out the sweaters and jackets. tomorrow there's a baseball ga
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
, and then we hear from a political science professor of columbia university with a preview of tomorrow's debate between president obama and mitt romney, with robert erikson. "washington journal" wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> president obama and mitt romney are wrapping up their preparations for their first debate. mr. romney in denver and president obama in henderson, nevada. we look at the c-span archival video from past presidential debates to determine whether presidential debates still matter. this hour-long program begins with an update from wall street journal correspondent laura meckler, with how the candidates are preparing for tomorrow night. >> laura meckler, as we look at the first of three presidential debates, this one taking place on the campus of the university of denver, this has been the debate season of expectation by the obama and romney campaigns. what has happened? >> the expectations are being set on two different levels. you have the obama and romney campaigns talking about how great the other guy is. the people in the obama camp cannot stop praising mitt r
to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers to train to make sure our young people have -- to make sure our young people have the skills that they need. we got to train 2 million workers at community colleges to bring down college tuition cost s. we got to cut our oil imports in half and create thousands of new jobs and energy. we got to use the savings from ending the war in iraq and afghanistan, to pay down our deficit. put some people to work, doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. that's why i'm asking for your vote. now, my opponent, he's doing a lot of -- a little tap dance at the debate the other night. trying to wiggle out of stuff he's been saying for years. doing like a -- like "dancing with the stars." or maybe it was "extreme makeover." debate edition. but no matter what he says, my opponent, he's a big believer of the top downeconomics. he thinks if we spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that favor the althiest, we get rid
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or with a constituent thinks is right? you could give to the question one way or another. the important thing to take away from that is there is tension between the elected representative wants to do and what the constituent wants to do. no one wants to run from office so they can cast a lever from what the constituents to do. you want to be a candidate because you believe in something. nobody wants to just pull the lever for what the constituents want to do. all a super pak really can do is identify places where the election representative has gone out too far from the constituency and educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion of the people. take that advertisements the crossroads ran and were running in the states talking about how the president passed a stimulus program. the stimulus was widely -- wildly unpopular. all they can do is hold the president or another elected official and account for what they did. it cannot change public opinion about st
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)